The Law and your pet plus why it is so important to identify your pet.

 

TeardropTeardrop comes home

Sydneysider Alison Miller was frantic when her 18-month old dog, Teardrop, went missing. Ten days later, Alison’s phone rang. Calling was a council ranger from Tamworth, 340Km away.

 

Teardrop had been microchipped and registered with Alison’s local council. When a ranger found the dog in Tamworth, he scanned for a microchip, checked the register and identified Teardrop.

‘I’m glad I had him chipped and registered’ Alison said. ‘Otherwise he could’ve been put down.’

 

In NSW, around 80,000 dogs and cats are lost, hurt or stolen each year. Most are impounded and of those that are taken to pounds, many are not able to be identified. The Companion Animals Act was introduced by the NSW Government in 1998 to protect pets, their owners and the broader community. If an animal is not claimed with 14 days the operators of the pound may have to euthanize the pet.

 

No matter where you get your dog from, make sure you contact the council where you are living to update your dogs micro chip details. You must know the microchip number (see Importance of Record Keeping)

 

Put an Identity Tag on Your Pet Immediately

Put an identity tag with contact ph numbers on your dog as soon as you get them. When a dog is new to a family it will be disorientated and may try to find a way out. Many hours have been wasted looking for owners and owners looking for dogs. All very upsetting for everyone concerned. People are more willing to intervene to rescue a dog if it is wearing a tag.

 

Registering Your Dog ( much cheaper if pet is desexed)

How to: Lifetime registration can be done at any local council. All NSW Councils are connected to the statewide Register.

What to take with you:

 

  • A certificate of micro chipping or a letter from your vet
  • Proof of de sexing from your vet or a statutory declaration
  • Any documents which entitle you to a discount

 

Once only registration Fee

Registration fees are remitted by councils to the State Government. Councils are reimbursed the majority depending on the number of animals kept in their area. Councils can then use this money for their animal management activities including providing rangers, pounds facilities, designated dog refuse bins, educational and other activities

 

Registration Type Registration Fee
Desexed cat or dog $40
Desexed cat or dog owned by a pensioner $15
Entire (undesexed) cat or dog $150
Entire cat or dog owned by a registered breeder $40
Assistance dogs Free

 

The Law and your pet

A very useful guide has been produced by The NSW Young Lawyers. This is a free publication produced to help with questions pertaining to:

 

  • nuisance orders
  • pets and property
  • pets and wills
  • dangerous and restricted dogs
  • animals and injury
  • animal cruelty
  • pets and family law
  • assistance animals
  • general requirements for keeping a pet